Strictly Technique: Playing the Sixes, Part 1 (August 2013 issue)

Strictly Technique
Playing the Sixes, Part 1: Volume and Accent Character
by Chris Prescott

Original post: http://wp.me/p1bQfj-7xg

Most of us tackled basic rudimental patterns when we first learned to play the drums. For me, these endless combinations were fun to practice, but I soon wondered why I would choose to play a more complex sticking when I could play a basic single-stroke roll instead. As a young student, the answer eluded me.

Even as I transcribed and learned some of my favorite songs, it seemed as if the fills were almost always based on a series of single strokes. This was not the encouragement I needed to stay on track with my rudimental training. Eventually, though, after my technique had developed a bit, I discovered distinct advantages to using the various sticking patterns.

The exercise in this video is designed to quickly illustrate a useful application of rudiments in a musical context. It consists of a two-measure pattern in any feel (rock, jazz, samba, etc.), with a 16th-note-triplet fill on beats 3 and 4 of the second measure.

For the complete article, which contains transcriptions and additional practice suggestions, check out the August 2013 issue of Modern Drummer.

Chris Prescott is a San Diego–based multi-instrumentalist who currently drums for Pinback and the Montalban Quintet. His drum education book, Creative Construction, is available at ccdrumbooks.com.

Original post: http://wp.me/p1bQfj-7xg

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12 Comments

  1. That was very useful, thanks Chris.
    I like lessons where we are shown alternative ways to use rudiments around the kit, other than what’s traditionally notated. I have the DVD "Methods & Mechanics For Useful Musical Drumming" by Todd Sucherman. He explains a lot of other ways to use Rudiments also.

  2. Check out this VIDEO lesson with Pinback/the Montalban Quintet drummer Chris Prescott – Playing the Sixes, Part 1: Volume and Accent Character
    http://buff.ly/1jbyhrn

    Most of us tackled basic rudimental patterns when we first learned to play the drums. For me, these endless combinations were fun to practice, but I soon wondered why I would choose to play a more complex sticking when I could play a basic single-stroke roll instead. As a young student, the answer eluded me.

    Even as I transcribed and learned some of my favorite songs, it seemed as if the fills were almost always based on a series of single strokes. This was not the encouragement I needed to stay on track with my rudimental training. Eventually, though, after my technique had developed a bit, I discovered distinct advantages to using the various sticking patterns.

    The exercise in this video is designed to quickly illustrate a useful application of rudiments in a musical context. It consists of a two-measure pattern in any feel (rock, jazz, samba, etc.), with a 16th-note-triplet fill on beats 3 and 4 of the second measure.

    #drums #drumming #drummers #lessons #ChrisPrescott #ModernDrummer #YouTube #video

  3. Another for #tbt. Check out this #video #lesson from drummer Chris Prescott (Pinback) Strictly Technique: Playing the Sixes, Part 1

    http://buff.ly/1ksZnaq

    #drums #drummers #drumming #ModernDrummer #magazine #ChrisPrescott #Pinback #HowTo #learn #educational #music

  4. Strictly Technique
    Playing the Sixes, Part 1: Volume and Accent Character
    by Chris Prescott

    Original post: http://wp.me/p1bQfj-7xg

    Most of us tackled basic rudimental patterns when we first learned to play the drums. For me, these endless combinations were fun to practice, but I soon wondered why I would choose to play a more complex sticking when I could play a basic single-stroke roll instead. As a young student, the answer eluded me.

    Even as I transcribed and learned some of my favorite songs, it seemed as if the fills were almost always based on a series of single strokes. This was not the encouragement I needed to stay on track with my rudimental training. Eventually, though, after my technique had developed a bit, I discovered distinct advantages to using the various sticking patterns.

    The exercise in this video is designed to quickly illustrate a useful application of rudiments in a musical context. It consists of a two-measure pattern in any feel (rock, jazz, samba, etc.), with a 16th-note-triplet fill on beats 3 and 4 of the second measure.

    For the complete article, which contains transcriptions and additional practice suggestions, check out the August 2013 issue of Modern Drummer.

    Chris Prescott is a San Diego–based multi-instrumentalist who currently drums for Pinback and the Montalban Quintet. His drum education book, Creative Construction, is available at ccdrumbooks.com.

    Original post: http://wp.me/p1bQfj-7xg

    Strictly Technique: Playing the Sixes, Part 1 (August 2013 issue)

    #drums #drummers #drumming #lesson

  5. From author Chris Prescott: "The snare is a C&C 5.5×14 maple/polar/maple. The rest of the kit is all maple with thin shells. On the snare, I use fairly high tunings. I usually start at a medium tension and then start tuning higher in tiny increments. Once the ringing tone starts to focus, and the drum has a good pop to it, I’ll stop. Then I’ll usually roll a piece of duct tape and stick it near the upper-left edge of the head. The cymbals are Sabian HHXs, and the hi-hats are 14" Legacys."

  6. Check out this VIDEO lesson – Strictly Technique: Playing the Sixes, Part 1
    http://buff.ly/1ti8lND

    Most of us tackled basic rudimental patterns when we first learned to play the drums. For me, these endless combinations were fun to practice, but I soon wondered why I would choose to play a more complex sticking when I could play a basic single-stroke roll instead. As a young student, the answer eluded me.

    Even as I transcribed and learned some of my favorite songs, it seemed as if the fills were almost always based on a series of single strokes. This was not the encouragement I needed to stay on track with my rudimental training. Eventually, though, after my technique had developed a bit, I discovered distinct advantages to using the various sticking patterns.

    The exercise in this video is designed to quickly illustrate a useful application of rudiments in a musical context. It consists of a two-measure pattern in any feel (rock, jazz, samba, etc.), with a 16th-note-triplet fill on beats 3 and 4 of the second measure.

    #vid #video #youtube #clip #learn #lesson #sixies #moderndrummer #chrisprescott

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